Sharing the love of aviation with others

Loading the airplane and getting ready for departure at Gaithersburg.

Loading the airplane and getting ready for departure at Gaithersburg.

Being a pilot has a number of advantages: the ability to travel immediately comes to mind. But there are many others, including the ability to share the magic of flight with friends. Humans have only been able to leave the earth for a few hundred years, and so the magic of flight is still something that enthralls us.

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Fly it like an airline pilot

One of the things that sticks with me from my instrument training is the saying of my flight instructor Meredith, who taught me “each time you fly, fly like an airline pilot!” What she meant in that is follow the checklist, be procedural in how you approach aviation, follow the rules, and be methodical. This approach to flying, especially on instruments has meant a lot to me as I’ve developed my piloting skills.

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The growth of pilot confidence

The day you earn your private pilot’s certificate, people are quick to tell you that you’ve just received your “license to learn.” And with a little more than 40 hours under your belt, you’re keenly aware of how much you just don’t yet know. In fact, the most terrifying flight of my life was probably the short hop from Frederick to Gaithersburg whilst the ink dried on my temporary certificate.

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A Few Night Landings

landingLast night I got a chance to fly again, the first time I was the flying pilot since February 14th. An instructor and I piled into my airplane for a ride to Tipton, then over to Martin State, and back to Gaithersburg. It had been a long time since I had done any kind of night landings; the FAA requires that pilots perform three landings at night to a full stop in order to carry passengers in the dark. My goal was to get current, and to gain some valuable experience.

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An Instrument Flight And A Systems Failure

Yesterday, exactly one week after receiving my instrument rating, I filed an IFR flight plan from Gaithersburg to Lancaster, intending to give this “single pilot IFR” thing a try. It was a severe clear kind of day, so there wasn’t going to be any actual attitude instrument flying; instead, it was a chance to test out my ability to obtain, follow and understand clearances and other important elements of the instrument flight rules system. Plus, it was a great opportunity to take a solo flight under IFR – something you don’t get to do until after your instrument rating is complete.

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Getting My Cloudbuster’s Badge

A little more than a year after hearing the words, “you’re a pilot now”, I earned my instrument rating and thus the right to fly through the clouds, rain and other weather. I took my instrument airplane checkride with Robert (Bob) Gawler at Gaithersburg, and despite being the more difficult checkride, it was a worthwhile experience.

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A Clemson Homecoming Weekend

Flying to Clemson, SC. Somewhere over Virginia.

This past weekend, Debbie and I flew down to Clemson, SC to visit her alma mater for homecoming weekend. From the very earliest 10 day forecast, the weekend was forecast to be clear and calm; the nor’easter that affected New York and New Jersey had moved far enough north that winds were not a concern along our route of flight (other than a very spiffy 15 knot tailwind we had), and we were blessed with absolutely clear conditions for nearly 500 miles in all directions. There was low fog in the hills of the Shenandoah mountains, and we could clearly see snow left over from Superstorm Sandy’s appearance in the Maryland and Virginia area.

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Be Prepared: An Aviator’s Motto

Last week, I had absolutely perfect flying weather and I decided that I would take a trip to visit a coworker in Raleigh, NC. Since FAR 61.65 (d)(1) requires any pilot applying for an instrument rating to have 50 hours of cross country time as pilot in command, it’s important for pilots to find every opportunity they can to accumulate cross country time. A round trip to Raleigh is 4 hours, offering plenty of opportunity to rack up some hours.

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